Metro North Regional Employment Board info@mnreb.org
Building Partnerships for a Better Workforce

STEM Activity Guide

The following examples of STEM-related activities represent just some of the many ways that businesses can partner with schools to inspire and engage students in STEM.  Also included here is some general information on how a company or organization can best prepare for a school-based STEM activity, as well as tips for schools on hosting STEM industry representatives. If you would like to suggest any additional activities for this resource, please contact us.

Contents



Guest Speakers

Description:

Guest speaking involves presenting on a topic or area of expertise in a forum or classroom setting. Some schools are interested in having speakers talk about their jobs, and others may want a speaker to talk about a specific subject such as wind energy or civil engineering.

 

Tips:

  • Find out what the class is covering at the time of your visit so you can tie in your presentation with what the students are learning in the classroom.

  • Obtain a clear time frame for your talk, as well as the size of your audience

  • If you have any items that you can bring to the presentation -- such as tools of the trade or an advertisement showing a large piece of equipment -- this will help to get the students excited about the topic.

  • Remember the age of your audience and get tips from the teacher. If the teacher can have the students brainstorm questions before you go and then email you the questions, this will help maximize the impact of the presentation.

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Beyond Benign

Biogen Idec

CDM

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair, Inc.

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Raytheon Company

Tufts University

Vecna Technology

Vertex Pharmaceuticals

Whitehead Institute

 

Representatives for Career Fairs


Description:


Job fairs are often large events held in gymnasiums or cafeterias. Some career fairs are more aligned to job fairs where the participants are looking for employment, so check to make sure you know the type of career fair being hosted.  Career fairs are most effective when both presenters and students are prepared to ask questions, engage in conversations, and share key aspects of their occupation as it relates to STEM areas.

Tips:

  • Bring items that represent your company and your occupational area to help engage the students

  • Ask the size of the group

  • Ask if you will be expected to do any presentations

  • Have a list of questions that you can ask students when they come over to your table. For example: “Do you know what plastics engineers do?”, “Do you own an iPhone?”, or other questions that will spark a discussion around your area of expertise

  • While give-aways such as pens or sticky pads with your company logo are often appreciated, linking the item with the student asking an inquisitive question will make the experience more meaningful for the student.

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Beyond Benign

Biogen Idec

CDM

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Raytheon Company

Verizon

Vertex Pharmaceuticals

 

 


Description:


Mentor programs take on many forms. Some programs are social/developmental in nature, providing positive adult role models for children or teenagers at risk. For STEM partnerships, mentor programs would be more focused on providing career exploration, awareness and guidance to students seeking to enter college or the workplace in a STEM career area. Mentoring is an effective way to reach students who may not be aware of the opportunities within the STEM fields. Providing insight into one’s job, career field and educational pathway can be invaluable. Mentoring programs can be in person or via email. In either situation, mentors should receive training and have a clear understanding of the goals and objectives of the mentoring experience.

 

Tips:

  • http://www.mentoring.org/ is a useful general resource for information about mentoring.

  • If a school asks you to be a mentor, ask these important questions:
    - What is the duration of the mentoring relationship?
    - What is the specific goal/outcome? (For example, to assist the student with the college search process for a school for mining engineering; or to assist the student with a research project for advanced physics class)
    - Are there scheduled meetings or activities for the mentors?
    - Ask for the name of someone who has served as a mentor so you can speak with them directly.

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Biogen Idec

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Raytheon Company

Tufts University

Vecna Technology

 

Job shadowing is a term used to describe an activity, hosted at a business location or industry event, where students have the opportunity to ‘shadow’ an employee for a few hours or a full day. Shadowing can be a good way to introduce students to all aspects of a STEM occupation or industry area. If you cannot accommodate students, consider allowing educators to shadow for a day. Mathematics and science teachers would welcome the opportunity to see academics applied in the workplace.

Tips:

  • Make sure the schools provide you with copies of the permission forms (signed by parents) authorizing the job shadow experience, in addition to key contact information in the event of an emergency

  • Identify some of the more unique aspects of your business and job (eg., employee services such as fitness and day care facilities)

  • Plan for lunch on-site with other employees. This helps introduce the student to the culture of the workplace.

  • Provide some information on hiring requirements such as educational or employment background needed for different jobs at the company. Usually a human resources representative can help put something together that indicates a variety of entry points.

Relevant Metro North Programs:

CDM

 

An internship is a formal workplace-based experience where students learn about an industry through participation in daily activities and events. Internships are often unpaid and directly connected to learning objectives. Students intern to learn new skills, develop references and establish relationships within the industry. Internships can vary in time and length, ranging from every day for a semester to once a week. Internships are valuable ways for students to learn about an industry and see academic content applied in the workplace.

Tips:

  • Internships are most successful when they are structured, and, when some form of evaluation is utilized to document the learning and skill development

  • It is important to review child labor laws prior to establishing an unpaid internship to insure that you are providing a learning experience and not unpaid employment. This can usually be established by having students work in an environment that requires completion of a license or postsecondary degree

  • Request documentation regarding parental permission, school internship regulations, contact person, expectations for attendance, and grading and reporting from the school/college prior to starting placement

  • CORI checks are often required for intern supervisors

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Biogen Idec

CDM

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Oracle (CA Headquarters only)

Raytheon Company

Vecna Technology

Verizon

Vertex Pharmaceuticals

 

Cooperative education is a formal work program that is generally offered at vocational/technical high schools or colleges for students in the last year or two of their program. Cooperative education positions are primarily paid employment and are part of the credit award system for completion of the school/college program. Cooperative education programs are covered by specific state and federal laws allowing students under the age of 18 to participate work in areas that are often limited to people over 18. The federal exceptions are described at the end of this document. One of the advantages to participating in cooperative education is the opportunity to employ a student in a temporary capacity with the possibility of offering a permanent position in the future. In addition, high schools offering cooperative education generally employ coordinators who work closely with businesses to insure that students are productive and engaged employees. Students are often eligible for cooperative education if they meet rigorous grade and attendance requirements. Evaluations are conducted throughout the term, and work performance directly impacts students’ grades.

Tips:

  • Cooperative education programs are governed by state regulations or university policy. Check with your local district or universities to request copies of their manuals or guidelines

  • An excellent resource on different program models can be found here: National Commission for Cooperative Education

  • Clear job descriptions and task lists can help define the cooperative education experience -- offer these to the sending school/college prior to student selection

  • Report any issues immediately to the cooperative education coordinator

  • Grade students honestly and accurately to ensure an effective learning experience

  • If a student doesn’t work out, request new referrals and interview carefully rather than discontinue the program

Relevant Metro North Programs:

CDM

Genzyme Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Vertex Pharmaceuticals

 

 

Teacher externships are unique programs where teachers from the sciences, mathematics or technical fields can work during the summer or over a school vacation break in a related industry. Externships are often paid or partially paid through stipends and the teacher’s expertise (such as chemistry) is directly linked to the externship. Externships can be viewed as temporary placements. For example, if a company just received a contract to produce a new paint compound, a chemistry or biology teacher could work with the lab technicians setting up studies and preparing tests. These experiences can be invaluable for the educator who then takes this new knowledge about the business and incorporates it into their lesson plans.

Tips:

  • Examine your temporary employment needs and determine if you could utilize a teacher before contacting a tem agency

  • Consider covering summer vacation times with a teacher

  • Define the duties, tasks and areas of knowledge required and work expectations prior to contacting the school system to post the position

  • Request feedback from the educator after the externship ends to help guide future programs and opportunities

Relevant Metro North Programs:

CDM

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

 

Educational tours are most effective when linked to a specific goal or objective such as introducing the students to all aspects of the industry or showing how a particular product is made. Whenever possible, engaging the students/educators in a small group activity or creating a handout with “simple questions to ponder” to distribute prior to the tour can make the experience more meaningful.

Tips:

  • Establish guidelines for tours/visits, including the number of students/educators you can tour at a given time, dates and times that are best for your company, access considerations and safety regulations.  Share this information with the school prior to the visit.

  • Consider having the teacher send questions that the students have developed prior to the visit. This will help tailor the experience to their areas of interest.

  • Request a list of participants before they attend so you know who is in your facility (alternatively, you can have them sign-in). Requesting information on any accommodations or medical concerns is fine and will help you to insure student safety. (Example: knowing a student is allergic to latex could be helpful if students would be going to be in a latex environment)

  • Start and finish in a location where the whole group can sit down. Present an outline of what they are going to see and then wrap up with questions and answers.

  • Request feedback from students and teachers regarding the experience.

  • If appropriate provide handouts about your industry or your relation to STEM learning

  • If appropriate provide a demonstration or allow students to witness something ‘cool’. The wow factor goes a long way!

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Beyond Benign

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Vecna Technology

Vertex Pharmaceuticals

 

 

Space for Educator Meetings/Student Workshops
Description:
Often educator groups are looking for spaces to host student or staff workshops. Holding events at area businesses can be an exciting way to support STEM learning. Spaces as small as conference rooms for educator meetings to larger lecture or training spaces for teacher professional development are always in demand. Education programs are also often looking for locations that will allow them to bring students from different schools to one location for a workshop or presentation.

  • Develop a list of possible spaces that could be used by educators or students. For each space, include the size, size, times available, access information, technology available, parking and food service contacts or regulations
  • Establish one department or representative for schools or organizations to contact
  • Consider tax credit for space donation.
  • Leverage the visit to promote your company and involvement in STEM efforts

Relevant Metro North Programs:

Biogen Idec

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Vecna Technology

 

Educator Education
Description:


Public school teachers are required to participate in a number of hours of professional development every 5 years in order to maintain their license. One way that STEM industries can assist teachers is to offer workshops or training in specific areas associated with their industry or to open up staff training to local teachers. For example, if your company is hosting a workshop on a new software program for CAD or CAM, and there are open spaces, invite high school engineering or drafting teachers to participate. Many schools will release teachers for one or two day trainings. Another example is offering a workshop for mathematics instructors showing the application of mathematics at every level of employment within a company covering topics such as algebra, statistics, geometry and trigonometry or calculus. This can be extremely eye opening for the teachers as well as bring relevance to the topics they are teaching.

Tips:

  • Brainstorm about topics or workshops that may be appropriate for educators.

  • Determine the level of educator (high school, college, k-8)

  • Request information from the school regarding specific topics that present challenges to either students or teachers. Schools may be able to tie an  activity directly into addressing weak areas in STEM subjects on MCAS.

  • Develop an evaluation form for feedback

Consider partnering with a STEM program or summer institute offered through the Massachusetts Department of Elementary or Secondary Education or Board of Higher Education

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

Beyond Benign

Biogen Idec

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair, Inc.

Oracle

Tufts University

Verizon

Whitehead Institute

 

 

A business-based or -led student workshops can be an effective way to use employees’ expertise to help students understand a STEM concept or learn about opportunities within the field. While student workshops can take on many forms, some of the most effective involve instruction in an academic concept or idea using the company’s resources. For example, a company could conduct a workshop on physics of motion, demonstrating the concepts through the operation of a major piece of machinery; or, a civil engineer could explain why a bridge stays up in high winds (or why it doesn’t - you can include footage of bridges coming apart).

 

Tips:

  • Work directly with the teacher to identify the learning objectives of the workshop/lesson

  • Incorporate hands-on, short activities into the presentation

  • Remember the age of the group and adjust language accordingly

  • Ask questions of the participants

  • Explain the objectives of the workshop/lesson at the beginning

  • Remember that it is okay if you don’t get to everything or if you change the program as you go along; it is most important to engage students, and help them make a connection between your field and their schoolwork

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Beyond Benign

Biogen Idec

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Tufts University

Whitehead Institute

 

Advisory Board Representatives

Description:


All vocational/technical schools, as well as many college programs and some high schools, have advisory boards to oversee their various programs. Vocational/technical high schools are always seeking industry representatives to serve on their advisory boards. Usually the boards meet formally twice a year to review the programs goals, accomplishments, placement record and recommendations. Industry representatives are a vital source of information on new and emerging issues and skills needed for the field. Advisory board members also help identify areas of instruction that may not be relevant due to advances in the industry, and can also recommend both curriculum and equipment upgrades.

 

Tips:

  • If you are interested in volunteering for an advisory board, contact your local vocational/technical high school, comprehensive high school or college

  • Once you are appointed to an advisory board, take the role to heart and provide valuable feedback on what seems to be working and what does not

  • Ask questions! The best contribution can be one that challenges some of the concepts or ideas presented

  • Get the schedule for meetings up front so you can plan accordingly

  • If possible, visit the program during the day when classes are in progress. This will enable you to reflect on content and delivery more effectively at the meetings.

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

CDM

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Raytheon Company

Vecna Technology

Verizon

Vertex Pharmaceuticals

 

Supplies or Equipment Donations

Description:


One of the most common requests from educational organizations is for equipment or supplies. Though businesses do not always have surplus materials, on occasion a system or lab space is updated and a local school or college could utilize that equipment to enhance their classroom. Equipment or supplies can range from desks and chairs to testing equipment or lab furniture. Before tossing or recycling items, check with your local school system to see if the equipment could be of use to them.

Tips:

  • If one does not already exist, develop a donation form that defines the condition of the equipment/supplies “as is.”

  • Establish if there is a tax credit value to the donated items.

  • Consider reducing the cost for educational institutions if the items are too valuable to donate but would be sellable

  • Consider donations when renovating or moving locations

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Raytheon Company

 

 

Grants or Foundation Opportunities
Description:

Many businesses have developed formal processes for handling funding requests from schools or colleges.  Often the grant process helps clarify which educational goals the company would like to support, and guides the school through a formal request process. Businesses, like funding agencies, want ensure their resources are used effectively and reach their target population. Developing a grant proposal, review, award and reporting system will help insure quality of delivery, as well as accountability for the funds provided. Focusing on a given area such as improving mathematics program delivery one year and teacher professional development the next, will diversify the recipients and provide a larger impact range. The Metro North REB can assist with grant program development or recommend other community organizations that provide such assistance.

 

Tips:

  • Determine what the company wants to support with monetary funds

  • Identify your company’s preferred outcomes

  • Create a timeline for the grant announcement, proposal closing dates, and proposal review and award

  • Be sure to include measurable outcomes in the proposal and set timeframes for submission

  • Establish purchasing or use of funds rules (for example can the money be used to send a teacher to a national conference? Does the teacher need to produce anything after attending?)

  • Request that grant announcements be posted on Metro North REB Web site (email hvogel@mnreb.org)

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

Biogen Idec

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair, Inc.

Raytheon Company

Verizon

 

 

Scholarships
Description:
All high schools and colleges have scholarship organizations or committees that work closely with businesses to set up and manage a scholarship program. Scholarships can be directly awarded from the company to the individual student, or, can go through the school system. Donations to scholarship funds can be considered tax deductions and may be easier to manage than checks directly to individuals.

 

Tips:

  • Establish your criteria and make your scholarship application available in early fall, with deadlines in late winter. This will give you time for selection before scholarship award nights.

  • Ask the date of the scholarship award ceremony so you can plan to have a representative there to give out the award

  • Send application information to schools by January, and request it be posted on the Metro North REB Web site (Email: hvogel@mnreb.org)

  • Gather information on award recipient so you can follow up on their progress in college, and possibly provide mentoring to assist them in their STEM postsecondary program.

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

CDM

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Raytheon Company

 

Employment and Workplace Readiness
Description:


If positions arise that could potentially be filled by a college student or high school graduate, consider sending job postings to your area colleges and schools. Business representatives can also assist with preparing students for employment by offering feedback or workshops on what industry expects in a resume, interview or work ethic. Guidance and academic faculty are typically enthusiastic about having a representative visit the school to explain the expectations within their industry.

Tips:

  • Consider all forms of employment, including building maintenance, lab clean up, reception or office assistance

  • Promote any educational assistance programs you may have on the postings

  • Consider cooperative education and/or internship options if full-time employment is not an option

  • Participate in career fairs and bring job postings

  • Assist with resume reviews for high school guidance or English teachers

  • Assist with mock interview programs

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Biogen Idec

CDM

Draper Laboratory

Genzyme Corporation

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Verizon

 

 

Competitions
Description:
There are many STEM-related competitions and contests available to students from middle school through the college level. There are a few ways companies and engineering organizations usually participate. The first is to host or run a contest. A good local example of this are the programs run by Engineer Your Future: http://www.engineeryourfuture.org/ There are hundreds of different contests ranging from creating posters to designing high-end solar cars.  A business or engineer does not need to run a contest however to get involved. Another great way to participate is to sponsor or volunteer to work with a school or college team developing a product for a contest. Programs may also be looking for judges. In the Massachusetts vocational school system there are regional and state competitions in a multitude of areas where judges are needed to evaluate students' work in engineering, robotics, electronics, and principles of technology to name a few. Thousands of students compete in the SkillsUSA contests and many from Massachusetts go on to represent the state at national competitions. Prizes range from classroom supplies to scholarships for individual winners.

Tips:


Starting a contest:

  • Determine what you would like students to demonstrate and the level of education with which you are interested in working

  • Research established contests to find models that would meet your goals

  • Make sure you have clearly defined rules, deadlines and material lists

Volunteering or Mentoring a school/college team:

  • Before you commit, find out the parameters of the contest: When is the contest? Are the business partners expected to attend the competition? Where is the competition? Is there a set schedule for working on the product? Is there an email mentoring option? Does the school have the resources to support the students entering the contest? Is there a staff member assigned to work with the students?

  • Whenever you are working with students you will be asked to fill out a CORI background check. It is required in public schools.

  • Be up front with the amount of time you can dedicate to helping the team.

  • Contests should be a joint effort between the school/college and the industry partner

  • Make sure that the school has committed to the activity

  • Celebrate with the students afterwards; whether they win or lose, the process of designing and completing a contest project is rewarding in itself

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

AECOM

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Vecna Technology

 

 

Web Resources
Description:


A number of companies and organizations have developed resources for teachers, students and parents to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Resources range from informational web pages on different careers and applications of STEM, to curriculum units or lesson plans or home activities that teach about the STEM area. Curriculum resources can be linked to a specific engineering or technical area like the IEEE resources (http://www.tryengineering.org/), or connected to a set of state or national standards like the resources at the Museum of Science (http://www.mos.org/educators/classroom_resources/resource_search). While these resources are primarily used by teachers and students, industry representatives may be able to find projects or activities they could use on a classroom visit or information about other engineering fields that would be helpful when working with students.

 

Tips:

  • Industry representatives can help design classroom activities that link the theory of science and mathematics to engineering and technology applications. One way to support these applications is to post samples of activities on your Web site

  • Always consider the learning objectives or standards before designing an activity. This will help integrate the activity into an existing curriculum.

  • Ask teachers about their challenges in getting information across, and brainstorm ways to bring the topic to life

  • Consider the use of recycled or common materials in activities and labs

  • Think about fun home-based activities that parents can do with their children, and ask different employees try them out.

  • Consider contributing to an already existing teacher, student or parent resource Web page

  • If your company does not have an ‘education outreach’ Web page, consider developing one to promote your company's partnerships and educate the community about your products and industry

 

Relevant Metro North Programs:

Beyond Benign

Draper Laboratory

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair, Inc.

Microsoft New England Research and Design Center

Raytheon Company

Tufts University

Verizon

______________________

Notes:

iPartial Exemptions for student employment of students under 18 (related to cooperative education)

 

How to Prepare for a School-based STEM Activity

When visiting a school or college, there is some information you will need to obtain before you visit:

  • Request the name and phone number of a contact person at the school.

  • Ask about parking. Is there a visitors lot?

  • Find out what door you are to enter, and where you should sign in. Most schools are locked and have a security process.

  • Identify the name of the class you are visiting so you can mention it when you are signing in.

The questions listed in the table below provide a starting point for discussion between business and schools who wish to collaborate on a STEM activity.  The goal of these questions is to help ensure an optimal learning experience for the students.

Type

Helpful Questions

Guest Speaker 

 

  • What are the goals for this presentation?
  • What content will the students be studying prior to my visit?
  • What key topics would you like my talk to include?
  • For how long should I speak?
  • What is the size of the group? Age, etc?
  • Are there artifacts (for show and tell) that students might find interesting?
  • Is there something I could demonstrate?
  • Is there AV equipment for a short video or PowerPoint?

 

College/Career Fair Participant:

 

  • What is the goal of the career fair?
  • What is the set up? Booths, round tables, trade show?
  • What am I expected to bring? What have others brought in the past?
  • Are there specific assignments for students coming to the event (e.g.  completing a work sheet, learning about one new career area)
  • Are students free to roam or expected to visit each presenter?
  • For how long will the event last, for what grades is it designed, and where will it be held?

Student Mentor:

 

You will want to have information on grade level, evaluation process, and contractual requirements of the mentoring program before you begin. In addition some of the following questions may be helpful.
  • What is the primary goal of the mentoring experience for the student?
  • What is the expected time frame for mentoring (how much time/week, what duration will the program last?)
  • When is the mentoring training? (Mentors should ALL be provided by training either through their company or the school).
  • How will the impact of the mentoring experience be measured (or seen as successful)?
  • What are the policies and processes for monitoring the mentoring program?
  • Do students receive a grade? Is there a project or outcome activity from the mentoring experience?

Workshop Leader:

 

  • What are the goals for this workshop?
  • How much time is allotted for the workshop?
  • Who is the audience (academic, technical teachers/students)
  • How does the workshop link to the school curriculum?
  • What kinds of hands-on activities will be possible? (tables vs. desks, supplies like tape, glue etc.)
  • How will the workshop effectiveness be measured?
  • Where and when is the workshop?
  • Is it part of a series? A stand alone activity?

How to Host a School Visit

Having a school group visit your place of business is an effective way to enable students to see the relationship between what they are learning in school and the world of work and research. Preparing for a school visit is vital if the event is going to be safe and engaging. Below are a few suggestions for dialog between the education and industry partner representatives that may be helpful in preparing for the visit.

  • Always obtain a contact name, phone number, and school information

  • What would the teacher/professor like the students to come away with after the visit?

  • Who will be coming and when would they like to visit?

  • Duration of the visit. When can/will the students get there? How long can they stay?

  • Is there any preparation the students will be expected to do before they visit our company?

    • One way to make a visit meaningful is for the teacher to have the students research the company before visiting and come prepared with one question each to ask someone from your business.

    • Another option would be to have the students follow up their visit with an activity that asks them to reflect on something they saw at the business that relates to their course work or career goals.

  • If the visit goes through their lunch period, plans for food will need to be made. Some options can include having students purchase lunch in the workplace cafeteria. The other is to provide a space where they can eat a lunch they brought or arrange pizza or another lunch with the partner at no cost or for a small fee depending on your resources for the event.

  • Ask the teacher who the students would like to meet. Make some recommendations as well; someone might not think of having the head of maintenance talk with the students but if you have a large building, managing the behind-the-scenes of a large facility can raise many STEM-related topics of discussion. 

  • Find out if there is any way to engage the students in an activity while at your company.  For example, you could ask them to give their feedback on a product your company developed or allow them to look at a sample through a microscope.
  • How will the event be evaluated? You should obtain feedback from the students as well as the teacher.

  • Ask the teacher if they have visited companies before and if so, what worked well in the past?

  • What will be the size of the groups? How many chaperones per group? (it is recommended that chaperones participate in, and stay for the duration of, the event)

  • Let people in the building know that students are coming to visit.

  • Enjoy!


 

 

   
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